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Ivomec Dosage Instructions for Heartworm Prevention and Treatment of Mange (Demodex and Sarcoptic)

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Disclaimer: I am not a veterinarian, nor do I have any formal training in any medical field. The information presented here is not meant to replace your vet's advice or prescribed medications, but only to suggest additional options to explore, based on your dog's condition.


Introduction

Liquid ivermectin (Ivomec) is available in 1% injectable solution for treating cattle and pigs, and in 0.08% oral solution for treating sheep (the 0.27% solution has been discontinued). Do not use Ivomec Plus, Ivomec Super, or any other products that contain additional active ingredients.

Note that all of these products are given orally. You should not use pour-on solutions, as they are not safe to give orally. A pour-on solution can be used topically (on the skin, not orally) to treat sarcoptic mange.

In most cases, you will need a syringe (no needle) that measures to the tenth of a cc to administer (see Where to Buy below).

Ivermectin 0.08% solution made for sheep can be used undiluted. An 8 oz (236 ml) bottle of ivermectin 0.08% solution costs around $28, and would be enough to treat 70,000 pounds of dogs.

Ivermectin 1% solution is more readily available, but without diluting it, the amount to give is too small to measure accurately even for large dogs. The proper way to use liquid 1% ivermectin solution for dogs is to dilute the ivermectin with food-grade (USP) glycerin or propylene glycol (liquid ivermectin injectable solutions are made with 40% glycerol and 60% propylene glycol, so we know that ivermectin mixes well with those ingredients). Some people have used vegetable oil instead because it tastes better and is easier to get, but the drug will not mix as well with oil and so the dosage within the solution may not be even. Vegetable oil may work if thoroughly mixed prior to giving and used within a short period; I wouldn't try to store any mixture made with vegetable oil.

A 50 ml bottle of ivermectin 1% solution costs around $35 and would be enough to treat 150,000 pounds of dogs when fully diluted. There are instructions below for creating a 30:1 dilution, which works best for small dogs and can also be used for large dogs, and also instructions for creating a 9:1 dilution, which is more suited to large dogs. See Buy Ivermectin, Glycerin and Propylene Glycol below for where to find these products.

It is possible to use ivermectin 1% solution undiluted if you're willing to give higher doses than are needed for heartworm prevention. This is safe for most dogs, as long as they do not have the MDR1 mutation that causes sensitivity to ivermectin, and as long as the ivermectin is not combined with spinosad, a flea control ingredient used in Comfortis and Trifexis (also called Vethical AcuGuard and ComboGuard). See Ivermectin Sensitivity below for more information.

An Ivermectin powder product that was mixed with ground corn and designed for pigs appears to have been discontinued.

See additional information below under How the Calculations Were Done.

Keep Ivomec and any unused mixture refrigerated and protected from light. The length of time the diluted mixture will remain potent is unknown. It is safest to mix each batch fresh, just before using. Ivermectin is sensitive to ultraviolet light and should be stored in the dark or by placing containers in an opaque bag.

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Ivermectin Sensitivity

Note that the dosages listed below are the same as is used in Heartgard, but it's safe to give a little more. For example, when using Heartgard Green for dogs weighing 26 to 50 pounds, the dosage used is calculated for a 50-pound dog, while a 26-pound dog would get twice as much per pound of body weight. Heartgard Blue is used for dogs weighing up to 25 pounds, so a 5-pound dog would get five times as much per pound of body weight as a 25-pound dog would. Dosages as high as 50 to 100 times the amount used to prevent heartworms are used to treat mites on dogs (demodectic mange).

High dosages of ivermectin are considered safe for all dogs except those with the MDR1 gene mutation that makes them sensitive to ivermectin and other drugs. Commonly affected breeds include the Collie, Australian Shepherd (all sizes), Shetland Sheepdog, English Shepherd, Old English Sheepdog, McNab, Border Collie, German Shepherd, Long-haired Whippet, and Silken Windhound. Mixed-breed dogs can also be affected. There is now a test available to screen for the presence of the mutated MDR1 gene that causes this problem, see Dogs with a Drug Problem for more information.

If your dog is a purebred or mixed-breed from one of the breeds above, or a mixed-breed of unknown parentage, and has not been tested for the MDR1 mutation, be very cautious using high doses of ivermectin for treating demodex, sarcoptic mange, or other parasites. Start with no more than one-third the regular dose for the first few days and monitor your dog closely. Stop the drug immediately if you see any signs of neurologic toxicity, including uncoordination or loss of balance (ataxia), depression, disorientation, excess salivation, pupil dilation, nystagmus (abnormal movement of the eyes), blindness, tremors, recumbency (inability to get up), or coma. Get your dog to a vet for supportive care if signs are severe or prolonged.

Very high doses of ivermectin, such as are used to treat demodex, are also problematic if combined with products that contain spinosad, such as Comfortis and Trifexis (also called Vethical AcuGuard and ComboGuard). Spinosad is a newer flea-control ingredient that increases the risk of neurological side effects from ivermectin. Dogs infected with heartworms may suffer an anaphylactic reaction from the death of too many microfilariae at once when given very high doses of ivermectin as well.

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Ivermectin Efficacy

Recent information has come to light that Heartgard may be only 95% effective, rather than 100% effective, in preventing heartworm infections. That means it will destroy 95% of heartworm larvae, not that 95% of dogs receiving Heartgard will remain heartworm-free.

The dosage of ivermectin used in Heartgard was the lowest found to be 100% effective at killing heartworm larvae when the product was originally approved. Since lower doses were less effective, it's possible that higher doses may continue to be 100% effective.

Higher doses of ivermectin are safe for all dogs except those with the MDR1 mutation. Dosages as high as 50 times the amount used to prevent heartworms are used to treat mites on dogs (demodectic mange). Very high dosages may also be problematic for dogs infected with Heartworms, and those being treated with Comfortis. See Ivermectin Sensitivity above for more information.

It may be best to double the amount of ivermectin you give your dogs in order to potentially provide better protection from heartworm infection. Again, this does not apply to dogs with the MDR1 mutation.

Note that higher doses of ivermectin are unlikely to be more effective against the resistant strain of heartworms that has been identified in the Mississippi River Valley. See New Information Regarding Heartworm Resistance for details.

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Heartworm Prevention

I don't endorse the extra-label use of liquid ivermectin for dogs, but I'm concerned that people are using it improperly, subjecting their dogs to potentially dangerous levels (for some dogs) of ivermectin. See below for information on how to properly dilute Ivomec 1% solution in order to make it safe to use for dogs. You can use 0.08% sheep drench undiluted.

The dosages shown below are used to duplicate the amount of ivermectin found in Heartgard, and should be given monthly for heartworm prevention.


Directions for using 0.08% sheep drench

Ivermectin sheep drench solution contains a lower concentration than other ivermectin products, so it can be used without diluting it first. Ivemectin is given orally (never use pour-on solutions for heartworm prevention).

Dosage using Ivermectin 0.08% solution for heartworm prevention (you may want to double these doses for better protection):

1 cc of ivermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution contains 800 mcg; 0.1 cc = 80 mcg.
The exact dosage is 0.034 cc per 10 pounds of body weight, or approximately 0.1 cc per 30 pounds of body weight.


Directions for making 30:1 dilution of 1% solution

A 30:1 dilution works best for smaller dogs. Ivemectin is given orally (never use pour-on solutions for heartworm prevention).

Mix 30 parts glycerin, propylene glycol, or vegetable oil to 1 part ivermectin 1% solution. Shake well before using to mix the ivermectin evenly. Refrigerate any unused portion (do not store mixtures with vegetable oil).

Dosage using Ivermectin 1% solution at 30:1 dilution for heartworm prevention (you may want to double these doses for better protection):

To make a small amount of the mixture, you will need a 1 cc syringe that measures accurately to the tenth of a cc. Draw up 0.1 cc of Ivermectin solution in a 1 cc syringe, and mix well with 3 cc of glycerin, propylene glycol, or vegetable oil, giving you 3 ccs at a dilution ratio of 30:1. This is enough to treat 300 pounds of dogs using the 1% solution.

To make larger amounts of the mixture, use a 1 fluid ounce dropper bottle, which is 30 ml. Put 1 ml of ivermectin solution in a 1 fluid ounce dropper bottle, then fill with glycerin, propylene glycol, or vegetable oil. This will be enough to treat 3,000 pounds of dogs (e.g., 300 10-lb dogs or 150 20-lb dogs) using the 1% solution.

1 cc of ivermectin 1% diluted 30:1 contains 333 mcg; 0.1 cc = 33 mcg.
The exact dosage is 0.0824 cc (approximately 0.1 cc) per 10 pounds of body weight.


Directions for making 9:1 dilution of 1% solution

A 9:1 dilution works best for larger dogs. Ivemectin is given orally (never use pour-on solutions for heartworm prevention).

Mix 9 parts glycerin, propylene glycol, or vegetable oil to 1 part ivermectin 1% solution. Shake well before using to mix the ivermectin evenly. Refrigerate any unused portion (do not store mixtures with vegetable oil).

Dosage using Ivermectin 1% solution at 9:1 dilution for heartworm prevention (you may want to double these doses for better protection):

To make a small amount of the mixture, you will need a 1 cc syringe that measures accurately to the tenth of a cc or a dropper bottle. Draw up 0.1 cc of Ivermectin solution in a 1 cc syringe, and mix well with 0.9 cc of glycerin, propylene glycol, or vegetable oil, giving you 1 cc at a dilution ratio of 9:1. This is enough to treat 333 pounds of dogs using the 1% solution.

To make larger amounts of the mixture, use a 1 fluid ounce dropper bottle, which is 30 ml. Put 3 ml of ivermectin solution in a 1 fluid ounce dropper bottle,  then fill with glycerin, propylene glycol, or vegetable oil. This will be enough to treat 9,000 pounds of dogs (e.g., 90 100-lb dogs) using the 1% solution.

1 cc of ivermectin 1% diluted 9:1 contains 1,000 mcg; 0.1 cc = 100 mcg ivermectin.
The exact dosage is 0.0272 ml (approximately 0.03 cc) per 10 pounds of body weight.


Directions for using ivermectin 1% solution undiluted

If you use ivermectin 1% solution undiluted, the dosage will be higher than is needed for heartworm prevention. This is safe for most dogs, as long as they do not have the MDR1 mutation that causes sensitivity to ivermectin, and as long as the ivermectin is not combined with spinosad, a flea control ingredient used in Comfortis and Trifexis (also called Vethical AcuGuard and ComboGuard). See Ivermectin Sensitivity above for more information.

Ivemectin is given orally (never use pour-on solutions for heartworm prevention).

Dosage using Ivermectin 1% solution undiluted for heartworm prevention: give 1 drop (one-half of 0.1 cc). This amount will provide more ivermectin than is needed for heartworm prevention, as follows:

1 cc of ivermectin 1% undiluted contains 10,000 mcg; 0.1 cc = 1,000 mcg, 1 drop = approx 500 mcg ivermectin.
The exact dosage is 0.00272 ml (approximately 0.003 cc) per 10 pounds of body weight.


Directions for using Ivermectin powder (this product appears to have been discontinued)

Ivemectin is given orally.

Dosage using Ivermectin powder for heartworm prevention (you may want to double these doses for better protection):

5 grams of ivermectin power contains 1,000 mcg ivermectin.
The exact dosage is 0.136 grams per 10 pounds of body weight. The company says that 1 teaspoon weighs 5 grams, but people who have weighed a level teaspoon of the powder have found that it weighs 2.8 grams. Based on this information:
1 level teaspoon (2.8 grams) of ivermectin powder contains 560 mcg ivermectin
1/4 tsp (0.7 grams) of ivermectin powder contains 140 mcg ivermectin
Give 1/4 tsp per 50 pounds of body weight.

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Demodectic and Sarcoptic Mange Treatment

Ivermectin can be used to treat demodectic mange (demodex) and sarcoptic mange (scabies). The dosage is much higher than that used for heartworm prevention, so it's important to have an accurate diagnosis prior to treatment, especially for demodex. See Ivermectin Sensitivity above for information on whether it is safe to give these high doses of ivermectin to your dog.


Demodectic Mange

Using Ivermectin 1% Injectable Solution to treat demodectic mange (demodex)

Ivermectin 1% injectable solution can be used undiluted to treat demodectic mange (demodex). The dosage is 50 to 100 times higher than the dosage used for heartworm prevention. In the case of demodex, this amount is given daily for weeks to months, so it’s very important to have an accurate diagnosis from your vet before beginning treatment. This treatment should not be used for dogs who have or may have the MDR1 mutation that causes sensitivity to ivermectin (see Ivermectin Sensitivity above for more information).

Dogs with demodex should be bathed weekly with chlorhexidine or benzoyl peroxide shampoo. Dogs with localized or mild demodex may respond to this treatment alone, without the need for drugs. Dogs with generalized demodex will require drug therapy in addition to weekly bathing. Secondary bacterial infections, which your vet can check for with the same skin scraping used to look for mites, are common, especially if the demodex sores are itchy or oozing, and require antibiotic treatment as well. For mild disease, weekly topical (spot-on) moxidectin with imidacloprid (Advantage Multi) can be effective (significant improvement should be seen within a few weeks).

The dosage of ivermectin for treating demodex is quite high, so it's not something you want to give unless you're sure it's necessary. Demodex is common in puppies, who often outgrow it naturally without the need for treatment. Demodex is not common in adult dogs unless their immune systems are compromised for some reason, such as hypothyroidism, hyperadreocorticism (Cushing's disease), or treatment with immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisone. It's important to make sure your dog is getting good nutrition, including good-quality protein, and there are also supplements, such as fish oil, that can help to regulate the immune system. If the problem is small and not spreading, you might try just treating with diet, supplements, and weekly baths to start with to see if that works without having to give medication. Note that dogs treated for demodex should not be used for breeding, since there can be a genetic propensity toward the problem.

Ivermectin 1% solution is given orally.

Dosage using Ivermectin 1% solution for treatment of demodectic mange:

Demodectic mange (demodex): Start with one-third the recommended amount (or less, if you suspect your dog might have the MDR1 mutation) for three days, then increase to two-thirds the recommended amount for three days. Stop the treatment immediately if signs of ivermectin toxicity are seen, including loss of balance, incoordination, lethargy, tremors, etc. If no adverse effects are seen, increase to the full recommended amount. Give this amount daily until one month after a skin scraping finds no live mites, which may take 3 to 6 months. A few dogs may require weekly therapy for life.

Calculations: Dosage is 300 to 600 mcg/kg of body weight. Each ml of ivermectin contains 10,000 mcg of ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 1,000 mcg ivermectin.

Keep Ivomec refrigerated and protected from light.

Warning: Do not combine high doses of ivermectin used to treat mange with any product that uses spinosad, including Comfortis and Trifexis (also called Vethical AcuGuard and ComboGuard). Do not give high doses of ivermectin to dogs with the MDR1 mutation that makes them sensitive to ivermectin. See Ivermectin Sensitivity above for more information.


Sarcoptic Mange

Using Ivermectin 1% Injectable Solution to treat sarcoptic mange (scabies)

Ivermectin 1% injectable solution can be used undiluted to treat sarcoptic mange (scabies). The dosage is 33 to 50 times higher than the dosage used for heartworm prevention.

Ivermectin 1% solution is given orally. See below for instructions for using ivermectin pour-on solution topically.

Dosage using Ivermectin 1% solution for treatment of sarcoptic mange:

Sarcoptic mange (scabies): Give this dosage once, then repeat two weeks later.

Calculations: Dosage is 200 to 300 mcg/kg of body weight. Each ml of ivermectin contains 10,000 mcg of ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 1,000 mcg ivermectin.

Keep Ivomec refrigerated and protected from light.

Warning: Do not combine high doses of ivermectin used to treat mange with any product that uses spinosad, including Comfortis and Trifexis (also called Vethical AcuGuard and ComboGuard). Do not give high doses of ivermectin to dogs with the MDR1 mutation that makes them sensitive to ivermectin. See Ivermectin Sensitivity above for more information.

Note: the same dosage can be used to treat roundworms, hookworms, and whipworms. References:


Using Ivermectin Pour-On for Cattle to treat sarcoptic mange (scabies):

Ivermectin Pour-On for Cattle, with 5 mg ivermectin per ml, can be used topically to treat sarcoptic mange (scabies). It cannot be used to treat demodex, so it’s very important to have an accurate diagnosis from your vet before beginning treatment.

Ivermectin Pour-On solution is used topically (applied to the skin, between the shoulder blades). Do not give orally (by mouth). See above for instructions on using ivermectin injectable orally.

Dosage using Ivermectin Pour-On solution topically for treatment of sarcoptic mange:

Sarcoptic mange (scabies): Give this dosage once, then repeat two weeks later.

Calculations: Dosage is 0.1 ml (500 mcg) per kilogram (2.2 lbs) of body weight. Each ml of ivermectin pour on solution contains 5,000 mcg of ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 500 mcg ivermectin.

Keep Ivomec refrigerated and protected from light.

Warning: Do not combine topical ivermectin used to treat mange with any product that uses spinosad, including Comfortis and Trifexis (also called Vethical AcuGuard and ComboGuard). Do not give topical ivermectin to dogs with the MDR1 mutation that makes them sensitive to ivermectin. See Ivermectin Sensitivity above for more information.

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Buy Ivermectin, Glycerin, and Propylene Glycol

You can find many of these products at feed stores. Make sure you buy oral or injectible products, not those intended for topical use. Prices below subject to change.

Amazon
Ivermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution, 8 oz (236 ml), $28 plus shipping.
Ivermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution, 960 ml, $57 plus shipping.
Ivermectin 1% solution, 50 ml, $29 plus shipping
Glycerin, food grade, various sizes and prices
Needleless syringes (for accurate measurements for mixing and dosing)
Dropper bottles (for mixing, storing, and measuring)

Jeffers Livestock 1-800-533-3377
Ivomec 0.8% sheep drench solution, 1000 ml, $73 plus shipping
Privermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution, 240 or 960 ml, $25-$52 plus shipping
Ivomec 1% solution, 50 ml, $35 plus shipping.
Ivermectin 1% solution (generic), 50 ml, $27 plus shipping
Noromectin 1% solution, 50 ml, $27 plus shipping (same as Ivomec)
Glycerin, 1 gallon, $32 plus shipping.
Propylene glycol, 1 gallon, $25 plus shipping.

Valley Vet 800-419-9524
Ivomec 0.08% sheep drench solution, 960 ml, $71 plus shipping.
Privermectin 0.08% sheep drench solution, 960 ml, $50 plus shipping
Ivomec 1% solution, 50 ml, $36 (free shipping).
Glycerin, 1 gallon, $27 + shipping.
Propylene glycol, 1 gallon, $19 + shipping.

The Chemistry Store 800-224-1430
Glycerin, 1 quart, $12 + shipping.
Propylene glycol, 1 quart, $12 + shipping.

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About J&R Enterprises ivermectin blend

Several people have contacted me about this product. The 0.0461% dilution they use would contain 461 mcg of ivermectin per 1 cc of mixture. According to the company, ivermectin is mixed with high quality propylene glycol.

The dosage they recommend is about two to three times what you would get in Heartgard, which should be safe for all dogs except possibly those with the MDR1 gene that makes them sensitive to ivermectin (see Ivermectin Sensitivity above for more information). This dosage may even provide better protection against heartworm infection.

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How the calculations were done

Heartgard dosage is a minimum of 6 mcg/kg (2.72 mcg/lb). Note that dogs at the lower end of the weight ranges get twice this much, or even more for very small dogs. Ivermectin has a very wide safety range; dosage for dogs with demodex is 300 mcg/kg, and this amount may be given daily over weeks or months. It's important not to underdose your dog, which may not be effective at preventing heartworms. Always round up when calculating dosage.

Heartgard Blue for dogs up to 25 pounds has 68 mcg ivermectin
Heartgard Green for dogs 26-50 pounds has 136 mcg ivermectin
Heartgard Brown for dogs 51-100 pounds has 272 mcg ivermectin

Ivomec 1% solution:

1 cc of ivomec 1% contains 10,000 mcg ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 1,000 mcg ivermectin
1 cc of ivomec 1% diluted 9:1 contains 1,000 mcg ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 100 mcg ivermectin.
The exact dosage is 0.0272 ml per 10 pounds of body weight, approximately 0.03 cc per 10 pounds of body weight.

1 cc of ivomec 1% diluted 30:1 contains 333 mcg ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 33 mcg ivermectin.
The minimum dosage is 0.0824 cc per 10 pounds of body weight, approximately 0.1 cc per 10 pounds of body weight.

Ivomec 0.08% sheep drench solution:

1 cc of ivomec 0.08% sheep drench solution contains 800 mcg ivermectin; 0.1 cc = 80 mcg ivermectin.
The minimum dosage is 0.034 cc per 10 pounds of body weight, approximately 0.1 cc per 30 pounds of body weight.

Ivermectin Powder for swine:

5 grams of ivermectin power contain 1,000 mcg ivermectin
1 gram of ivermectin powder contains 200 mcg ivermectin
The minimum dosage is 0.136 grams per 10 pounds of body weight.

The company says that 1 teaspoon weighs 5 grams, but people who have weighed a level teaspoon of the powder have found that it weighs 2.8 grams. Based on this information:
1 level teaspoon (2.8 grams) of ivermectin powder contains 560 mcg ivermectin
1/4 tsp (0.7 grams) of ivermectin powder contains 140 mcg ivermectin
Give 1/4 tsp per 50 pounds of body weight.

Measurement notes:

Note that you should always round the dosage up, not down. It's fine to give a little more than is needed, but if you give less, your dog may not be protected.

For the most part, larger dosages are safe, as long as your dogs are not infected with heartworms (in which case, very high doses may kill off too many microfilariae at once, which can lead to an anaphylactic reaction), or if your dogs have the mutation that makes them more susceptible to ivermectin. Even then, as long as you're close to the dosage above, you should be fine, it's just when you give 10 times as much as you should or more that you might run into trouble. This is quite common if you follow recipes on the internet, which often leave out the fact that the ivermectin must first be diluted 9:1 with another liquid, making the dosage ten times what it should be.

http://web.archive.org/web/20061104194714/http://www.heartwormsociety.org/katrina.htm
"Be careful when calculating doses and administering ivermectin solution, as the concentration in most available solutions is very high compared to the dose needed for small animal treatment. Remember 1% solution = 1 gram/100 ml = 10 mg/ml = 10,000 ug/ml [ug=mcg]. . . . People often dilute 1% solution with 99 mls of propylene glycol [dilution ratio of 99:1], to create a solution that is 100 micrograms per ml. The preventive dose of ivermectin for a 10 kg [22 lb] dog then would be .5 mls."

http://www.espomagazine.com/vet/apr96.htm
"As mentioned in that article, the dose of Ivermectin necessary to treat or prevent intestinal parasites is about 30 times the dose used to prevent heartworm disease. The dosage you listed, 0.1 cc per 10 pounds of body weight, is the dosage recommended for the prevention of intestinal parasites and heartworms [thus, it's 30 times higher than needed to prevent heartworms alone]. Therefore, if you wish to use the cattle wormer, Ivomec, as a heartworm preventative only, the amount needed would, indeed, be too minute to measure accurately. One way to solve the problem is to dilute a small amount of Ivomec in vegetable oil or propylene glycol (a solvent sometimes used to treat bloat in livestock). The vegetable oil tastes better, but the drug will mix better with propylene glycol because that is the same liquid used to dissolve the Ivermectin in a bottle of Ivomec.
"One dilution scheme which would minimize waste would involve using a 1 cc syringe and the more common 3 cc syringe. Draw up 0.1 cc of Ivomec., using the small syringe, and mix well with 3 cc of vegetable oil or propylene glycol [this is a dilution ratio of 30:1]. Using this diluted product, the heartworm preventative dose would be a familiar 0.1 cc per 10 pounds of body weight. A larger amount could be diluted and stored in the refrigerator for future use, but the length of time its potency would remain is unknown."

Mange:

Canine Demodicosis
1% ivermectin is given orally beginning at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/day and increased by 0.1 mg/kg every 3 days assuming toxicity does not occur. The therapeutic dosage range is from 0.3-0.6 mg/kg/day. A cure rate of 85-90% can be achieved at 0.6 mg/kg/day. Expect to treat cases for 3-6 months.

Anti-Parasitics
In small animals, all use for skin conditions is extra-label in the USA. For Demodex , the dosage is 0.3-0.6 mg/kg, PO, sid until 2 negative skin scrapings 1 mo apart.

Demodex (Mange Mite)
Ivermectin injectable may be given orally at escalating doses using 100 µg/kg increments. Begin with 100 µg/kg for 3 days followed by 200 µg/kg for 3 days followed by 300 µg/kg. Some practitioners recommend remaining at the 300-µg/kg dose whereas others recommend continuing to increase the dose every 3 days to 600 µg/kg. It may take up to 33 weeks to resolve lesions and eliminate mites. Continue treatment for 1 to 2 months after two consecutive negative skin scrapings.

Sarcoptic Mange in Dogs
Ivermectin at a dosage of 300 micrograms/kg (0.3 mg/kg) given orally twice at 2-week intervals or given 4 times at weekly intervals can be used in some animals to treat sarcoptic mange.

Mange in Dogs and Cats
Other endectocides, such as moxidectin and ivermectin, which are not registered for the treatment of sarcoptic mange in dogs, have been reported to be quite effective depending on the dosage and route of administration. Ivermectin (200 µg/kg, PO or SC, 2 treatments 2 wk apart) is very effective and usually curative.

Small Animal Dermatology
Ivermectin given orally at 0.2-0.4 mg/kg three times 7 days apart, or injected subcutaneously twice 14 days apart, is effective against the mite.

Topical (pour-on) ivermectin in the treatment of canine scabies.
The efficacy of a pour-on formulation of ivermectin at 500 micrograms/kg body weight applied on the dorsum on days 1 and 15 was evaluated in 90 dogs from a shelter, naturally infested with Sarcoptes scabiei. This very practical form of treatment was successful in eradicating scabies from this shelter.

Treatment of demodicosis in dogs: 2011 clinical practice guidelines (and summary)

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If you have any questions or comments, you can contact me, but I have less time to answer questions than I used to, and it may be several days to a week before I can respond. My name is Mary Straus and you can email me at either or

   


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